wind (page 7)

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    A side note: what wasn’t a founding purpose of the REPS mandate

    In my Carolina Journal column today I noted: … North Carolina’s [electricity] rates have been among the most competitive in the nation. That changed when the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standards law passed in 2007. The REPS mandate forced utilities to use an increasing proportion of high–…
    Jon Sanders, October 13, 2016
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    Matthew reminds us: electricity really is a basic human necessity

    The idea for my Carolina Journal column today came to me Sunday night, while I was sitting in the dark with the rest of my family reading by candlelight and hoping we would have power and water restored soon. Duke Energy’s blanket announcement that it’d be done by…
    Jon Sanders, October 13, 2016
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    Detroit News editorial: ‘Green energy’ hurts the poor

    The editorial, by Utah State professor William Shughart and researcher Michael Jensen, reiterate points made here. They argue that the politicized drive for “green energy” is drowning out the much greater problem of energy poverty. (The chart on the right comes from a recent Locker Room post about energy…
    Jon Sanders, August 16, 2016
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    Federal energy subsidies and the battle between cronies

    The New York Times asks, "What would happen if the federal government ended its subsidies to companies that drill for oil and gas?" The American oil and gas industry has argued that such a move would leave the United States more dependent on foreign energy. Many environmental activists counter that ending subsidies could move the United States toward a future free of fossil fuels — helping it curtail its emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The first part of the NYT's answer is correct insofar as it would make foreign oil and gas marginally more competitive. The second part is utter fantasy and wrong in many ways. The question itself is far too narrow for a discussion of energy subsidies. It ignores the far, far greater subsidies for renewable energy, and it also ignore the massive regulatory burden placed on traditional energy sources — which are penalties or, in a different way of looking at it, negative subsidies. Further discussion and graphs follow.
    Jon Sanders, August 8, 2016
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    Even more reasons why renewable energy mandates make electricity cost much more than it should

    Here's a graph for you. Further down I'll explain what it means:
    Jon Sanders, August 4, 2016
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    Cute. But sorry, renewables, the “Gig” is up…

    A light-hearted tweet from Clean Energy NC on twitter hearkens back to Back to the Future (the scene, for those of you woefully in the dark about it): NC Solar Power Could Send Doc Back to the Future https://t.co/kGqzr2s19y #CleanEnergy #NCGA pic.twitter.com/Bl1eI2ObvR — Clean Energy in NC (@cleanenergync) June 30, 2016 Thing is, the time machine car was originally powered with a teensy pellet of plutonium. To generate an equivalent burst of energy naturally, compactly, they needed a bolt of lightning. Renewable energy!? Hello? Hello? Anybody home? Huh? Think, McFly!
    Jon Sanders, June 30, 2016
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    Why solar and wind are the most expensive way to reduce emissions

    The most important consideration in electricity provision is cost to consumers. Electricity is a basic human need. In North Carolina that need gets met by a monopoly provider. There is, however, this idea that electricity provision is about creating more jobs and cutting emissions. (If you think about it for…
    Jon Sanders, June 20, 2016
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    Natural gas did most of this. Lower emissions from fracking. Or as the ‘Clean Energy C[ronies]’ call it, HYDRO-FRACKING!

    Here’s an interesting graph from the federal government’s Energy Information Administration today in a release entitled “U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in 2015 are 12% below their 2005 levels“: The EIA explains:  In 2015, U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions were 12% below the 2005 levels, mostly because of…
    Jon Sanders, May 10, 2016