Taxes (page 221)

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    New Carolina Journal Online features

    This week’s Carolina Journal Online Friday interview features a conversation with Joseph Henchman of the Tax Foundation about Tax Freedom Day. Melissa Mitchell’s guest Daily Journal questions the value of educational fads.
    Mitch Kokai, May 20, 2011
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    New at CJO: Committee approves ‘tax me more’ fund

    David Bass’ latest Carolina Journal Online report documents a state House committee’s vote to approve a new state “tax me more” fund.
    Mitch Kokai, May 19, 2011
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    Newsweek addresses the impact of economic uncertainty

    We’ve discussed before in this forum the negative impact of uncertainty on economic activity. The latest Newsweek tackles the topic as well. Like too many other small-business proprietors, Arth doesn’t fully trust this economic recovery. While he says he’s “guardedly optimistic” about it, his…
    Mitch Kokai, May 19, 2011
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    New Carolina Journal Online features

    David Bass’ latest Carolina Journal Online article offers a progress report for the new Republican-led General Assembly. John Hood’s Daily Journal wades through inconsistent claims about the impact of state taxes and spending on North Carolina’s economy.
    Mitch Kokai, May 19, 2011
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    New at CJO: Cabarrus vote confirms trend of low-turnout elections for sales tax hikes

    The latest Carolina Journal Online report explains how Cabarrus County voters’ approval of a quarter-cent sales tax hike fits with a pattern followed in other North Carolina counties.
    Mitch Kokai, May 18, 2011
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    Sowell looks beyond the rhetoric on ‘taxing the rich’

    Thomas Sowell's latest column posted at the Washington Examiner questions President Obama's emphasis on taxing "millionaires and billionaires." President Obama's constant talk about "millionaires and billionaires" needing to pay higher taxes would be a bad joke, if the consequences were not so serious. Even if the income tax rate were raised to 100 percent on millionaires and billionaires, it would still not cover the trillions of dollars the government is spending. More fundamentally, tax rates -- whatever they are -- are just words on paper. Only the hard cash that comes in can cover government spending. History has shown repeatedly, under administrations of both political parties, that there is no automatic correlation between tax rates and tax revenues.
    Mitch Kokai, May 18, 2011
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    Spreading the word about N.C.’s real state budget numbers

    Partisans on all sides toss around a lot of numbers connected to North Carolina’s state budget debate. Some of those numbers are more accurate than others, and some are subject to misuse. Joseph Coletti discussed the importance of highlighting accurate, dependable information about the budget during a presentation today to…
    Mitch Kokai, May 16, 2011
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    Beacon Hill Institute’s tax model

    Some on the Left have said the Beacon Hill Institute’s methodology to determine the economic impact from tax cuts was debunked in Arizona, but Beacon Hill presented a thorough response to those criticisms. If you’re interested in the technical points and assumptions of tax and spending policy models, you…
    Joseph Coletti, May 13, 2011