Taxes (page 220)

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    This weekend on Carolina Journal Radio

    Media outlets have tended to cover the Occupy movement as a left-of-center version of the Tea Party Is that an accurate characterization?. Jon Ham dissects the coverage during the next edition of Carolina Journal Radio. John Hood reacts to Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger’s recent comments about…
    Mitch Kokai, November 4, 2011
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    New at CJO: JLF letters prompt removal of offending sales-tax promotional material

    A new Carolina Journal Online report notes that letters from John Locke Foundation legal expert Daren Bakst have prompted two school systems and the city of Durham to remove from their websites material supporting local sales-tax referendums on next week’s election ballot.
    Mitch Kokai, November 3, 2011
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    Constituents ready for an end to NC’s death tax

    The Civitas Institute’s latest poll ought to give comfort to anyone seeking to eliminate North Carolina’s death (estate) tax. An overwhelming majority of likely voters in the state—two thirds—oppose it. In fact, only 25 percent of the 600 individuals surveyed either somewhat or strongly support the death tax.
    Fergus Hodgson, November 2, 2011
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    New Carolina Journal Online features

    Karen Welsh reports for Carolina Journal Online about Kinston’s vote to determine whether the mayor should have veto power. John Hood’s Daily Journal punctures myths about taxes.
    Mitch Kokai, November 2, 2011
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    JLF experts question Montgomery County’s proposed sales-tax hike

    Terry Stoops and Fergus Hodgson wonder why Montgomery County is seeking a $250,000 sales-tax hike on top of a recent $1 million property-tax increase. Learn more about their critique here. After raising property taxes by $1 million and increasing county revenues by $1.7 million between 2009…
    Mitch Kokai, November 1, 2011
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    A libertarian offers Boehner rare praise

    Kevin D. Williamson of National Review rarely offers Republican congressional leaders much praise. This week he makes an exception for House Speaker John Boehner. Speaker Boehner does not excite many budget hawks, and there are good reasons to be skeptical of the Republican leadership…
    Mitch Kokai, November 1, 2011
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    Raleigh taxpayers fund NAACP?

    Courtesy of the Wake Community Network, During the October 18, 2011, Council Meeting, Mayor Meeker stated the NAACP is holding its first Institute in Raleigh next March. He talked about the possibility of the City of Raleigh being a presenting sponsor which would require a $5,000 donation. He asked…
    Terry Stoops, November 1, 2011
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    Oh the irony: Advocating liberty to Americans. (Q&A from tax debate)

    At the end of last week's tax debate, my opponent and I received about 45 minutes of questions from audience members. Most of these attacked pro-liberty ideals, which also happen to be American ideals. As I was born in New Zealand and moved to the United States in adulthood, this placed me in a bizarre scenario: advocating liberty to Americans. Here are seven of the questions that perhaps best represent the total. Almost all were directed at me, but my opponent, John Scott of the University of North Carolina, made a few remarks as well. 1. "Legitimate" taxation, and what about government education? (three minutes) [audio:http://bit.ly/u7CHUI] I didn't actually use the phrase "taxation is alright for a legitimate cause," but the question remains, and it is by no means an easy one. Many people—staunch libertarians or anarchists—say all taxation is theft and unacceptable. The minarchist or minimal-government libertarian position is that taxation is only warranted for defensive activities, the protection of life, liberty, and property. That equates to police, national defense, and a judicial system. Activities such as these better fit the characterization of "protectorate," rather than "government." In other words, they are only in place to protect individual rights, rather than to redistribute wealth, provide entitlements, or manage individuals, as collectivists so desire. They are, however, the roles originally prescribed by the Declaration or Independence, the United States Constitution, and the North Carolina Constitution. Article 1, Section 1 of the North Carolina State Constitution: We hold it to be self-evident that all persons are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, the enjoyment of the fruits of their own labor, and the pursuit of happiness.
    Fergus Hodgson, October 31, 2011