Taxes

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    Mecklenburg ASC’s future with no sales tax bailout

    Mecklenburg voters soundly rejected a proposed quarter-cent sales tax hike in November. The $50 million tax hike to bail out the Arts & Science Council would have delivered $22.5 million per year to the Arts and Science Council, $17 million to parks and greenways; $8 million to education; and $2.5…
    Joseph Coletti, January 17, 2020
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    Some Wake Residents Could Save $ If The County Goes Revenue-Neutral

    It’s that time again. Time for Wake residents to brace themselves as the county reappraises residential and commercial property values. Wake County property owners may be less fortunate in this area than their fellow North Carolinians because, according to a research brief recently published by JLF’s Joe Coletti: Wake County…
    Brenee Goforth, January 17, 2020
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    Economic Development Incentives Not Creating Jobs Promised

    This week, JLF’s Jon Sanders wrote a research brief examining a recently released WRAL report by Tyler Dukes. The report examined the number of jobs created from North Carolina’s Job Development Investment Grant (JDIG) program and the One North Carolina (OneNC) fund from 2009 to 2016. Sanders summarizes the…
    Brenee Goforth, January 9, 2020
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    Another impact of today’s tax debates: People prepare to ‘vote with their feet’

    Tuesday’s Daily Journal about facts and consequences related to taxation prompted a response. Attorney David Lesperance (with “The Lesperance Letter” blog) submitted the following via email. Dear Mr. Kokai: I just finished reading your article “Tax debates often ignore facts, negative consequences” and thought I would…
    Mitch Kokai, January 8, 2020
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    New Carolina Journal Online features

    Kari Travis reports for Carolina Journal Online on experts’ assessment that voter ID presents a no-win situation for N.C. Attorney General Josh Stein. John Hood’s Daily Journal explains why selective tax breaks are unwise.
    Mitch Kokai, January 8, 2020
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    Last year Gov. Cooper approved $146 million in corporate giveaways

    At the same time, Cooper would have media, teachers, and you believe that money not taken from corporations is one-to-one money not given to teachers.
    Jon Sanders, January 3, 2020
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    Three Obamacare taxes going away

    David Catron of the American Spectator highlights a positive development on Capitol Hill involving the Affordable Care Act. House Democrats, forced by a budget deadline to divert a little energy from impeachment to their primary legislative function, have reluctantly negotiated a spending agreement with congressional Republicans and the…
    Mitch Kokai, December 19, 2019
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    Highlighting the federal government’s complicated process of boosting the poor

    Kevin Williamson of National Review Online turns his attention to the federal government’s bizarre process of providing money for the poor. The bill from Senator Romney (R., Utah, lately) and Senator Bennet (D., Colo.) would make the federal tax credit for children “fully refundable,” meaning that people who…
    Mitch Kokai, December 19, 2019