Politics (page 976)

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    This weekend on Carolina Journal Radio

    Media outlets have tended to cover the Occupy movement as a left-of-center version of the Tea Party Is that an accurate characterization?. Jon Ham dissects the coverage during the next edition of Carolina Journal Radio. John Hood reacts to Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger’s recent comments about…
    Mitch Kokai, November 4, 2011
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    New Carolina Journal Online features

    This week’s Carolina Journal Online Friday interview features a conversation with Patrick Michaels of George Mason University and the Cato Institute about his recent book, Climate Coup: Global Warming’s Invasion of Our Government and Our Lives. Jon Sanders’ guest Daily Journal delves into a recent presidential…
    Mitch Kokai, November 4, 2011
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    Send In the Chinese!

    On the front page of the New York Times* and the Chronicle of Higher Education today is a story about Chinese students in American universities. Much of the story is about the troubles that both sides are having with the relationship: the Chinese are sometimes getting ripped off…
    Duke Cheston, November 3, 2011
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    Maddow’s dam story

    If you enjoyed Jonah Goldberg’s dissection of a goofy MSNBC commercial in which host Rachel Maddow touts the big-government virtues of the Hoover Dam, you might appreciate Arthur Herman’s latest contribution to National Review Online: Hoover Dam has become something of a liberal icon…
    Mitch Kokai, November 3, 2011
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    Carney, Corzine, and cronyism

    Upcoming John Locke Foundation Headliner Timothy P. Carney devotes some attention in a new Washington Examiner article to former New Jersey governor and Obama crony Jon Corzine. Former Democratic politician Jon Corzine’s financial firm MF Global collapsed over the weekend in a…
    Mitch Kokai, November 3, 2011
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    Hanson examines the ‘fat-cat few’

    Since the president and his allies have taken to blasting “fat cats at the top” while the occupiers rail against the “1 percent,” Victor Davis Hanson devotes his latest National Review Online column to exploring the lives of those who “occupy” that dreaded class.
    Mitch Kokai, November 3, 2011
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    New report on teacher pay

    In Assessing the Compensation of Public-School Teachers, Jason Richwine and Andrew Biggs conclude that “public-school teacher salaries are comparable to those paid to similarly skilled private sector workers, but that more generous fringe benefits for public-school teachers, including greater job security, make total compensation 52 percent greater than fair…
    Terry Stoops, November 2, 2011
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    Obama and Bush as wartime executives

    The latest issue of Hillsdale College’s Imprimis features former U.S. Attorney General Michael Mukasey’s assessment of the Obama administration’s approach to the fight against Islamism. President Obama campaigned for office largely on the claim that his predecessor had shredded the Constitution. By the Constitution, he could not have meant the document signed on September 17, 1787. Article II of that document begins with a simple declaration: “The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America.” Not “some” or “most” or even “all but a teeny-weeny bit” of the executive power. The President is vested with all of it. This is particularly noteworthy when compared with the enumerated legislative powers vested in Congress: “All legislative Powers herein granted.” The Founders understood, based in part on their unfortunate experience under the Articles of Confederation, that the branch of government most likely to be in need of the ability to act quickly and decisively is the executive. The branch most likely to overreach is the legislature. The conversation reminds this commentator of an observation from former Bush anti-terrorism official Juan Zarate during an interview with Carolina Journal Radio/CarolinaJournal.tv.
    Mitch Kokai, November 2, 2011