Politics (page 1067)

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    Lowry explores the president’s left turn

    Rich Lowry‘s latest National Review Online column describes a “McGovernite Obama.” When Pres. Barack Obama took the podium last Friday to abruptly announce the imminent end of the Iraq War, he ended on a ringing McGovernite note: “After a decade of war, the nation…
    Mitch Kokai, October 25, 2011
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    The link between federalism and humility

    A political system based on federalism requires a degree of humility. In the U.S. context, this means an understanding that federal bureaucrats and elected officials don’t have all the answers for every problem. Kyle Scott, visiting assistant professor in the Duke University political science department, explored the themes of federalism…
    Mitch Kokai, October 24, 2011
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    Upcoming JLF Headliner sides with Occupiers … on one issue … for different reasons

    Timothy P. Carney‘s latest Washington Examiner article explains why the Occupy Wall Street crowd isn’t the only group that should be mad at big banks. Liberal protesters “occupying” Wall Street hate the big banks, which they see as the engine of capitalism. But conservatives…
    Mitch Kokai, October 24, 2011
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    Has Joe Klein been reading Roy Cordato’s work?

    You might remember Roy’s comparison of President Obama’s economic policies to George W. Bush on steroids. Joe Klein’s latest TIME column suggests he might agree. [T]here are problems with the President’s new populist tack. The first is the OWS movement itself, which…
    Mitch Kokai, October 24, 2011
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    Cain’s 9-9-9 plan gets some praise from an unlikely source

    Fareed Zakaria, not known for his rabid right-wing tendencies, has some nice things to say in the latest TIME about Herman Cain’s tax plan. I am going to defend not Cain’s specific policy proposals but their general thrust. His plan is sloppy…
    Mitch Kokai, October 24, 2011
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    Sticking up for the 1 percent

    Joel Stein pokes a bit of fun in his latest TIME column at the Occupy movement’s claims to represent 99 percent of Americans. It’s not just that we admire the 1%. We need them. The 1% started Time Inc., creating my job.
    Mitch Kokai, October 24, 2011
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    New Carolina Journal Online features

    Dan Way reports for Carolina Journal Online about a partial privatization plan for the N.C. Zoo. John Hood’s Daily Journal documents the Occupy movement’s descent into self-parody.
    Mitch Kokai, October 24, 2011
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    Stand firm Grover: Tax pledges still apply

    Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, is under fire. More than half of U.S. representatives—238—have signed his ATR pledge to not raise taxes under any circumstances. (That includes six of North Carolina's 13 representatives, all Republicans.) So when the super-committee issues its recommendations next month, either there will be no tax increases or implementation will require pledge violations from 21 representatives. The notion that higher taxes could be off the table, however, is unfathomable to many. For example, Rep. Frank Wolf (R-W.Va.), one of six House Republicans that have not signed the pledge, has accused Norquist of “paralyzing congress” with ideological purity and working with “unsavory characters.” Evidently, hyperbolic metaphors, exaggerations, and personal attacks remain in vogue, perhaps because the relevant evidence leads us to an altogether different conclusion. (Norquist explains the ATR pledge to Stephen Colbert below.)   The Colbert Report Get More: Colbert Report Full Episodes,Political Humor & Satire Blog,Video Archive Of those who have attempted to address the ATR pledge directly, they express two leading concerns. (1) We cannot maintain the generosity of the federal spending and balance the budget (not that they’ve passed one) without higher revenues. (2) A hard line against any tax increases impedes the closing of many loopholes for special interest groups.
    Fergus Hodgson, October 21, 2011