Politics (page 1023)

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    Interesting thoughts from Juan Williams

    Former John Locke Foundation Headliner Juan Williams offers Newsweek some thoughts about his association with Fox News and his liberal friends’ openness to opposing views. Have you taken heat from African-Americans who find you not “liberal” enough? People say, “Why are you airing dirty laundry? Why…
    Mitch Kokai, July 29, 2011
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    Do we need a nut?

    An article in the latest Newsweek highlights research from Tufts University mood disorder expert Nassir Ghaemi, who suggests that we might want a commander-in-chief during trying times who’s not quite all there. He argues that what sets apart the world’s great leaders isn’t some splendidly healthy…
    Mitch Kokai, July 29, 2011
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    New Carolina Journal Online features

    This week’s Carolina Journal Online Friday interview features Donna Martinez’s conversation with Jenna Ashley Robinson of the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy about the new NCCollegeFinder.org website. Don Carrington’s guest Daily Journal takes political commentators to task for misusing the state’s latest unemployment numbers to…
    Mitch Kokai, July 29, 2011
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    CMS PR campaign, phase two: Blame the process

    Mecklenburg Citizens for Public Education and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools have initiated phase two of their public relations campaign. Phase one, what Meck Deck blogger Tara Servatius calls the “oh-so-broke shuffle,” is complete.  Phase two is in full swing.   CMS officials and their boosters now blame the “budget process”…
    Terry Stoops, July 28, 2011
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    An argument for raising the debt limit

    Yes, it makes sense to push for a debt-limit deal that puts the brakes on runaway federal government overspending. But Philip Klein of the Washington Examiner makes the case today for making a deal sooner — rather than later — even if it's not ideal. Even if various accounting tricks and payment prioritization could buy the government a few more weeks, or even months, at some point, as long as no plan balances the budget immediately, the debt limit will have to go up to accommodate additional deficit spending. As things stand, not a single Republican in Congress has offered a plan that would reduce deficits to zero in August, and virtually every Republican has voted for at least one budget that would continue adding to deficits. The most aggressive budget on the table, offered by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., doesn't balance the budget until 2016 -- and it anticipates $1.2 trillion in deficits in the coming four years. So the actual debate isn't over whether the debt limit will be raised, but over when it will be raised and under what conditions. And for those of us who want to shrink government, the question is whether it would advance our cause more to raise the debt limit now, or wait until after Aug. 2, come what may. Some conservatives insist that if Republicans hold firm, President Obama and the Senate Democrats will eventually cave and we'll get serious budget reform without any tax increases. But that's wishful thinking.
    Mitch Kokai, July 28, 2011
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    Barnes thinks Reagan would back the Boehner deal

    Fred Barnes writes for The Weekly Standard that he believes the 40th president would approach the debt-limit debate in a similar manner to that employed by House Speaker John Boehner, since “Reagan never let the perfect or the unattainable keep him from achieving the good.”…
    Mitch Kokai, July 28, 2011
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    Sowell dissects Obama’s ‘shameless effrontery’

    You might not be able to fool all of the people all of the time, but Thomas Sowell‘s latest column explores how President Obama attempts to fool “people who have not followed the issues in any detail” on a regular basis. Another word that…
    Mitch Kokai, July 28, 2011
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    Hanson explores the president’s curious about-face on deficit spending

    Victor Davis Hanson‘s latest column at National Review Online explains that opposition to President Obama’s budget proposals “reflects genuine puzzlement — and, yes, anger — over a president addicted to debt, who suddenly wants to preach to others about their responsibility to pay back what he…
    Mitch Kokai, July 28, 2011