Monetary policy (page 3)

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    Barron’s columnist pokes fun at recent investments

    Jack Hough of Barron’s seeks an outrageous scheme to lure potential investors. Interest rates are falling, growth is scarce, and there is a glut of investment dollars. That means Wall Street is setting up perfectly for a flight to nonsense. I need a disruptive business plan in a…
    Mitch Kokai, April 8, 2019
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    Business-casual central banking

    Jim Grant writes at Barron’s about an increasingly casual approach to monetary policy. In finance today, comfort trumps propriety. As necks are tieless, so are earnings “adjusted.” As shirts are untucked, so are balance sheets encumbered. In the 21st century way of doing business, freedom of action is…
    Mitch Kokai, April 1, 2019
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    Fund defends Trump’s Fed nominee

    John Fund of National Review Online ponders the criticism of President Trump’s nominee to join the Federal Reserve Board. The Washington policy guild often operates like a medieval guild in its effort to screen out “ignorant” heretics who hold disruptive ideas. Just look at their hysterical overreaction to…
    Mitch Kokai, March 26, 2019
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    Fed’s policy prompts concerns

    James Grant shares with Barron’s readers his concerns about current thinking among Federal Reserve leaders, including Vice Chairman Richard Clarida. Clarida acknowledged no doubts. He said that radical monetary policy has worked, that it will continue to work, and that it may well become more radical. He contended…
    Mitch Kokai, March 4, 2019
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    Barron’s notes growing indifference to growing deficits

    Randall Forsyth of Barron’s documents a disturbing trend for deficit hawks. [T]he administration of President Donald Trump, the self-described “king of debt,” is running a budget deficit at an annual rate of $1 trillion, or nearly 5% of gross domestic product, in part because of a huge tax…
    Mitch Kokai, March 4, 2019
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    Forbes ponders the euro’s 20th anniversary

    Steve Forbes uses his latest Forbes magazine column to puncture myths about the common European currency. Since 2008, the EU has been beset by economic crises that have dulled any luster the new currency had. Too bad. Had Europeans understood the proper principles of monetary policy, the euro…
    Mitch Kokai, February 18, 2019
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    A warning about an ‘oblivious’ Fed

    Avi Tiomkin writes for Barron’s that the head of the Federal Reserve appears to be following regrettable precedents. The Federal Reserve recently suggested that it was finished raising interest rates for now, and might even stop shrinking its post-financial-crisis balance sheet sooner than expected. Even so, in delivering…
    Mitch Kokai, February 18, 2019
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    Forbes issues warning about weak dollar

    Steve Forbes argues in the latest Forbes magazine that conditions leading to the 2008 economic downturn have not been resolved adequately. COUNTLESS COMMENTARIES and articles are marking the tenth anniversary of the panic of 2008. Yet almost all ignore the root cause of the crisis: a weak dollar.
    Mitch Kokai, October 17, 2018