K-12 education (page 360)

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    New at CJO: Traditional public school students recruited to fight charter bill

    Sara Burrows’ latest Carolina Journal Online report details a case of Rutherford County public school students participating in an email campaign against legislation designed to lift North Carolina’s public charter school cap.
    Mitch Kokai, April 7, 2011
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    In case you missed him …

    Terry Stoops questions some proposed restrictions added to a bill designed to lift North Carolina’s public charter school cap. He shared his concerns during an interview with WTVD (ABC11).
    Mitch Kokai, April 7, 2011
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    Conservatives, tea parties, and mysterious forces

    Does "conservative" and "tea party" mean the same thing?  The writers at Education Week appear to want readers to think so.  In an article titled, "Tea partiers playing a role in some school board races," Ed Week identifies Wake County as the "best known example" of the tea party movement's involvment in school board politics.  Of course, do not ask them for evidence. They ain't got it. Though difficult to quantify, the same forces that swept conservative candidates into office on the congressional and state levels appear to be working their way down to some local races. Did you get that?  The title of the piece declares that tea partiers are playing a role in school board races, but the involvement of the tea party cannot be quantified (unless you, I don't know, polled voters in these areas).  Furthermore, there are similar "forces" that are "working their way down" to school board races.  What are these magical forces and do they have anything to do with midi-chlorians?
    Terry Stoops, April 6, 2011
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    Supreme Court: Arizona’s school choice program stays

    For an excellent overview of Arizona Christian School Tuition Organization v. Winn, read this Wall Street Journal op-ed. Although the case centers on the issue of taxpayer standing, I am pleased that Justice Kennedy’s majority opinion and Justice Kagan’s dissenting opinion mentions James Madison’s famous “Memorial and Remonstrance.” As…
    Terry Stoops, April 5, 2011
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    Finns to the left, Finns to the right

    Do we need a longer school day and/or school year to help our students “compete in the global economy”? If you’ve paid attention to Terry Stoops’ work, you already know the answer. TIME offers more evidence for this view in a new feature focusing on education…
    Mitch Kokai, April 4, 2011
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    Trust us, we’re doctors

    Two weeks ago, researchers at Duke University released preliminary results of a study about pre-kindergarten programs in North Carolina.  According to the press release,  "North Carolina third-graders have higher standardized reading and math scores and lower special education placement rates in those counties that had received more funding for Smart Start and More at Four when those children were younger." A full report is not available, so we do not have access to many of the specifics of the study.  But researchers have released a Power Point presentation with a summary of the sample and methodology.  For example, the study sample includes "all children of the appropriate age in a county when the program is available, regardless of whether a child participated directly."  One of the limitations of the study is that it does not include "all children who have access to the program" because the researchers "lose some of them and treatment status for some is unclear."
    Terry Stoops, April 1, 2011
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    Legislative efforts to limit the negative impacts of student-athlete concussions

    Anthony Greco’s latest CarolinaJournal.tv report explores legislation designed to limit the harmful impacts of concussions in student athletic events.
    Mitch Kokai, April 1, 2011
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    Wake County: Long travels=lower scores

    Wake County’s response to the complaint filed with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights has people talking.  According to the News & Observer, “School officials presented data this week showing that the academic performance of elementary and middle school students who are involuntarily assigned declined the…
    Terry Stoops, April 1, 2011