K-12 education (page 327)

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    N.C. Appeals Court upholds trial court ruling in Wake schools’ open meetings suit

    A unanimous three-judge panel of the N.C. Court of Appeals has affirmed most of a trial court’s ruling in an open-meetings lawsuit filed against the Wake County school board in connection with a controversial March 2010 meeting. The trial court had found that the school board had violated the open-meetings…
    Mitch Kokai, April 19, 2011
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    Sowell tackles the bull tied to debates about bullying

    Thomas Sowell's latest column at Human Events focuses on the empty rhetoric that often substitutes for action in addressing the problem of bullying. When politicians want to do nothing, and yet look like they are doing something, they appoint a blue ribbon committee or go to the U.N. or assign some Cabinet member to look into the problem and report back to the President -- hoping that the issue will be forgotten by the time he reports back. When educators are going to do nothing, they express great concern and make pious public pronouncements. They may even hold conferences, write op-ed pieces or declare a "no tolerance" policy. But they are still not going to do anything that is likely to stop bullying. In some rough schools, they can't even stop the bullying of teachers by the hooligans in their classes, much less stop the bullying of students. Not all of this is the educators' fault. The courts have created a legal climate where any swift and decisive action against bullies can lead to lawsuits. The net results are indecision, half-hearted gestures and pious public pronouncements by school officials, none of which is going to stop bullies.
    Mitch Kokai, April 19, 2011
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    New at CJO: Teacher training center could be on the chopping block

    David Bass’ latest Carolina Journal Online report focuses on a controversial North Carolina teacher training center that could face the budget ax under House Republican budget plans.
    Mitch Kokai, April 14, 2011
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    The good, the bad, and the … meh

    In its latest issue, Newsweek asked 20 “leaders and experts” for ideas about policy fixes federal officials should pursue right away. Some are good, while others smack of nanny-state paternalism. Among the more interesting suggestions is that of Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels: merit-based civil service.
    Mitch Kokai, April 14, 2011
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    House budget, first look

    Live Blog House Appropriations subcommittees started debate yesterday on the specifics what it means to balance the budget in a pro-family, pro-growth way. Proposed savings in primary and secondary education of $694 million are midway between Gov. Perdue's $351 million and the John Locke Foundation's $1 billion. Community College…
    Joseph Coletti, April 13, 2011
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    Charter schools: More than just “laboratories”

    Those who oppose charter schools, as well as those who say they don’t but really do, have argued that charter schools have not lived up to their promise of being “laboratories of innovation.”  The truth is that innovation is one of six purposes of charter schools, as outlined in the…
    Terry Stoops, April 13, 2011
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    Parental choice: Free or forced?

    Tyler Whittenberg, education and law policy fellow at the N.C. Justice Center, nails it in his latest op-ed.  By “it,” I mean the last line of the piece.  Here is the concluding paragraph of the op-ed: Would you want to send your child to a school that avoids accountability…
    Terry Stoops, April 12, 2011
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    Paternalism unleashed: No brown bags at Chicago school

    Chicago’s Little Village Academy public school plans to ban “brown bag” or homemade lunches.  According to principal and amateur nutritionist Elsa Carmona, “Nutrition wise, it is better for the children to eat at the school.  It’s about … the excellent quality food that they are able to serve (in…
    Terry Stoops, April 12, 2011