Jobs and economy (page 383)

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    New Carolina Journal Online features

    This week’s Carolina Journal Online Friday interview features a conversation with Mount Olive College economist Paul Cwik about the failure of Keynesian economics and “Say’s revenge.” Dsvid Bass’ guest Daily Journal explains why it’s time for the millennial generation to grow up.
    Mitch Kokai, November 11, 2011
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    Do We Need An Invisible Surgeon General?

    In an article published in Forbes, Henry Miller of the Hoover Institution calls U.S. Surgeon General, Regina M. Benjamin “an embarassment” and concludes that she “should be shown the door.” He continues, The current Surgeon General, Regina M. Benjamin, had until recently focused her most of her attention…
    Terry Stoops, November 10, 2011
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    Borders discusses disguised stimulus

    The latest Ideas Matter update from Max Borders focuses on the Obama administration’s push for a stimulus program that’s not advertised as “stimulus.” In the latest of desperate moves by the Obama administration, we get a merely semantic shift from “stimulus” to “job…
    Mitch Kokai, November 9, 2011
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    Community colleges and employment outcomes

    The Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment (CAPSEE) will fund 12 research projects that examine “relations between postsecondary education, including education and training prior to the bachelor‘s degree level, and employment outcomes.”  North Carolina will be a site of the first project.  Arne Kalleberg of the University…
    Terry Stoops, November 8, 2011
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    Deleting our killer apps

    Historian Niall Ferguson chooses that present-day metaphor in a new Newsweek article to describe the problems Western societies face today: The West first surged ahead of the Rest after about 1500 thanks to a series of institutional innovations that I call the “killer applications”: 1. Competition. Europe was politically fragmented into multiple monarchies and republics, which were in turn internally divided into competing corporate entities, among them the ancestors of modern business corporations. 2. The Scientific Revolution. All the major 17th-century breakthroughs in mathematics, astronomy, physics, chemistry, and biology happened in Western Europe. 3. The Rule of Law and Representative Government. An optimal system of social and political order emerged in the English-speaking world, based on private-property rights and the representation of property owners in elected legislatures. 4. Modern Medicine. Nearly all the major 19th- and 20th-century breakthroughs in health care were made by Western Europeans and North Americans. 5. The Consumer Society. The Industrial Revolution took place where there was both a supply of productivity-enhancing technologies and a demand for more, better, and cheaper goods, beginning with cotton garments. 6. The Work Ethic. Westerners were the first people in the world to combine more extensive and intensive labor with higher savings rates, permitting sustained capital accumulation.
    Mitch Kokai, November 8, 2011
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    Progress NC turning legitimate?

    When he is not spending his time calling Heather Losurdo a bankrupt-stripper-liar, Progress NC’s Justin Guillory offers insightful commentary on policy. Just for the record, I have never declared bankruptcy.  To the dismay of ladies everywhere, I have never been a stripper.  Occasionally, I tell a fib, tall tale,…
    Terry Stoops, November 7, 2011
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    New Carolina Journal Online features

    Sara Burrows reports for Carolina Journal Online about a bill to permit B corporations in North Carolina. John Hood’s Daily Journal focuses on steps government leaders can take to welcome entrepreneurs and investors to North Carolina.
    Mitch Kokai, November 7, 2011
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    How Keynes and Hayek will shape the 2012 presidential race

    If you think the debates between John Maynard Keynes and F.A. Hayek would interest no one but economists, author Nicholas Wapshott offers a different perspective. In this snippet from his hourlong Hayek Lecture at Duke University Thursday, Wapshott discusses the impact of the Keynes-Hayek debate on present-day American…
    Mitch Kokai, November 4, 2011