Family (page 7)

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    Should schools provide support services to students?

    Denise Superville’s Education Week article, In Some Cities, Closing Achievement Gaps Is Not for Schools to Fix Alone, examines the role of schools in providing social services to students.  She writes, The idea is that focusing on student’s individual needs in four areas—academics, health, family, and social-emotional well-being—and matching…
    Terry Stoops, September 19, 2018
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    “The difference between those working for a cause and those making a cause work for them.”

    That’s the topic of a recent Quillette piece in which Clay Routledge takes a critical look at the social justice movement. Here are some excerpts [with my favorite passages emphasized in bold]: Other writers have argued that the secular left has turned social-justice ideology into their religion.
    Jon Guze, September 15, 2018
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    Entitlements always expand

    Get paid now to take parental leave in exchange for deferring Social Security payments later. It sounds like a simple and “budget neutral” to help women earn more in their careers while getting their children off to a good start. Kristin Shapiro, Andrew Biggs, and others have argued on…
    Joseph Coletti, September 5, 2018
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    Is giving always good?

    We have a love-hate relationship with philanthropy, which starts with questions of fairness and has been magnified for the past hundred years by the income tax. One manifestation is the continuing debate over donor-advised funds from community foundations and Donors Trust to the National Christian Foundation and…
    Joseph Coletti, August 24, 2018
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    Poor families hurt as regulations make child care harder to find and afford

    Deregulation offers a better, lower-cost way to expand access to out-of-home childcare than larger federal government subsidies, Ryan Bourne explains at Governing online. Easing regulations would address the underlying question: “Why is child care so expensive?” Staff-child ratio rules and worker-qualification requirements, in particular, increase prices and reduce availability,…
    Joseph Coletti, August 20, 2018
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    National Review column promotes Rubio’s paid-leave plan

    Samuel Hammond writes at National Review Online about potential benefits from U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio‘s proposed plan for paid parental leave. Last week, Florida senator Marco Rubio introduced the Economic Security for New Parents Act, a paid-parental-leave plan. A companion bill is expected from Missouri congresswoman Ann Wagner…
    Mitch Kokai, August 8, 2018
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    You can’t win if you don’t show up

    Charles Fain Lehman of the Washington Free Beacon highlights news that should disturb all of us (especially those who’ve followed Mark Steyn for years.) The U.S. fertility rate hit a 42-year low in the first quarter of 2018, new data released Wednesday by the Center for Disease…
    Mitch Kokai, August 3, 2018
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    Low-income students see little reason to graduate high school, so they don’t

    You may have heard of the Scared Straight program that sought to use prison visits to keep teens on the right side of the law. It did not. The effort is one of the few programs in the Results First database that had negative social returns on each…
    Joseph Coletti, July 10, 2018