Environment (page 98)

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    House budget, first look

    Live Blog House Appropriations subcommittees started debate yesterday on the specifics what it means to balance the budget in a pro-family, pro-growth way. Proposed savings in primary and secondary education of $694 million are midway between Gov. Perdue's $351 million and the John Locke Foundation's $1 billion. Community College…
    Joseph Coletti, April 13, 2011
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    New at CJO: Lawmakers block stream reclassification

    Karen Welsh’s latest Carolina Journal Online report discusses House Bill 62, which blocks a controversial reclassification of Boylston Creek in Transylvania County.
    Mitch Kokai, April 13, 2011
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    Spinning for Wind Power

    The News & Observer in an editorial makes some “misstatements” about wind power. Wind power, like solar-generated electricity, isn’t “on” all the time, as a coal- or gas-fired generating station can be. But the fuel is free and emissions are nil. Construction costs are far lower than with nuclear…
    Daren Bakst, April 11, 2011
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    Chu’s voodoo

    Despite evidence to the contrary, President Obama’s Energy Secretary — Steven Chu —continues to deny the fallacy of global warming alarmism, as Newsweek highlights in its latest issue: You have said “science has unambiguously shown that we’re altering the destiny…
    Mitch Kokai, April 8, 2011
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    Gee, when you put it that way, it really does sound like a friggin’ terrible idea

    Headline in the New York Times today: "Rush to Use Crops as Fuel Raises Food Prices and Hunger Fears." NYT reports: Each year, an ever larger portion of the world’s crops — cassava and corn, sugar and palm oil — is being diverted for biofuels as developed countries pass laws mandating greater use of nonfossil fuels and as emerging powerhouses like China seek new sources of energy to keep their cars and industries running. ... But with food prices rising sharply in recent months, many experts are calling on countries to scale back their headlong rush into green fuel development, arguing that the combination of ambitious biofuel targets and mediocre harvests of some crucial crops is contributing to high prices, hunger and political instability. ... Soaring food prices have caused riots or contributed to political turmoil in a host of poor countries in recent months, including Algeria, Egypt and Bangladesh, where palm oil, a common biofuel ingredient, provides crucial nutrition to a desperately poor populace. During the second half of 2010, the price of corn rose steeply — 73 percent in the United States — an increase that the United Nations World Food Program attributed in part to the greater use of American corn for bioethanol. Longtime readers of The Locker Room knew this would happen back when Pres. George Bush signed biofuels initiatives into law. Here, for example, is a chart I made back in 2008:
    Jon Sanders, April 7, 2011
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    The death of environmentalism?

    Environmentalism isn’t dead, but its role as an important force in American politics and public policy has faded to the point at which it’s hard to find a pulse. Steven Hayward of the American Enterprise Institute and Pacific Research Institute made that case during a presentation today to the John…
    Mitch Kokai, April 4, 2011
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    The EPA’s carbon regulation goals

    Daren Bakst and Roy Cordato have been warning you about federal regulators’ efforts to clamp down on carbon dioxide emissions. The latest TIME features an interview in which Environmental Protection Agency chief Lisa Jackson sheds more light on the topic.
    Mitch Kokai, April 4, 2011
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    TIME tackles shale gas

    The latest TIME cover story focuses on the pros and cons of pursuing America shale gas deposits to meet future energy needs. Using new drilling methods pioneered by a Texas wildcatter, companies have been able to tap enormous quantities of gas from shale, leading to rock-bottom…
    Mitch Kokai, April 4, 2011