Entrepreneurship

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    Why Failure Can Be a Good Thing

    I know an amazingly successful business person who says she failed at a lot of things before finding success. I thought of my friend as I read this piece on failure from Fast  Company. Throughout my years as a journalist, failure is probably the most frequent subject I’ve talked…
    Donna Martinez, August 20, 2018
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    If this is what people think of capitalism, no wonder they want something else

    Michael Tomasky, editor of the journal Democracy, has advice for those who would like fewer socialists. “Stop creating them.” Tomasky outlines a number of ways that cronies in government and business have helped one another without doing much good for the rest of society. Free market supporters from…
    Joseph Coletti, August 7, 2018
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    Fighting Health Care Cronyism

    With the help of the Institute for Justice, a Winston-Salem physician has filed a lawsuit challenging North Carolina’s certificate of need laws. From IJ’s press release: Imagine living in a neighborhood dominated by expensive restaurants with poor service and lackluster food. You see an opportunity and decide…
    Jon Guze, August 3, 2018
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    England Didn’t Win the World Cup, but It’s Number 1 in Vaping

    Matt Ridley explains how it happened at the Rational Optimist: More people use ecigarettes in the UK than in any other European country. It’s more officially encouraged than in the United States and more socially acceptable than in Australia, where it’s still banned. There is a thriving…
    Jon Guze, July 16, 2018
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    Corporate incentives in two minutes

    Edmund Malesky, a political science professor at Duke, and his co-author Nathan Jensen explain the failure of corporate incentives and their continued popularity for politicians in this brief video. Short answer: incentive offers are a way for politicians to show they care and they are trying, like most government programs.
    Joseph Coletti, June 26, 2018
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    Can laws change how we shop?

    What happens to retailers and service providers in the next recession? They are reliant in the Triangle on consumers who already owe $4.5 billion in credit card debt, an average of $10,000 to $16,000 per household. Until then, experiences are displacing things in storefronts. Alex Marshall starts with a North…
    Joseph Coletti, June 13, 2018
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    Cronyism’s Cost in Competitiveness

    New research continues to highlight the economic burdens imposed by big government regulations and big corporation cronyism in the US. For all the concerns about the heavy hand of Brussels on members of the European Union—and in Europe’s most competitive countries, this was a real concern—the EU has actually reduced…
    Joseph Coletti, June 12, 2018
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    Dignity and respect in public policy

    What did the teachers gathered in Raleigh last week have in common with Pres. Donald Trump, besides an affinity for red clothing? The teachers’ union called the walkout a “Rally for Respect,” not just pay. And Trump’s campaign to “Make America Great Again” was seen as a way to restore…
    Joseph Coletti, May 22, 2018