Economy (page 2)

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    Impeachment vs. economy

    David Catron writes for the American Spectator about the clash between D.C. impeachment buzz and the economic news on Main Street. The Democrats face an insurmountable obstacle in their ongoing quest to oust the president. Trump himself succinctly captured their dilemma last Friday: “Unemployment Rate, at 3.5%, drops…
    Mitch Kokai, October 8, 2019
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    Experts underestimate the Trump economy

    Editors at Issues and Insights examine expert estimates of Trump administration economic policies. The most surprising thing about the latest unemployment report isn’t that the rate dropped to the lowest level since December 1969. It’s that unemployment wasn’t supposed to get anywhere near that low under President Trump.
    Mitch Kokai, October 7, 2019
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    Back to the future for labor unions

    Sean Higgins of the Washington Examiner reports on the proposed revival of a long-discarded labor union process. In a sign of the importance of labor backing in the 2020 Democratic primary, several candidates have courted unions by endorsing the idea of “sectoral bargaining,” that is, collective bargaining on…
    Mitch Kokai, October 4, 2019
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    “The Unacknowledged Success of Neoliberalism”

    That’s the title of an interesting EconLog post by Scott Sumner. Here’s how it starts: The neoliberal policy revolution that began in the late 1970s might be the most important recent event in world history. But it remains a curiously elusive and underreported phenomenon. Many on the left…
    Jon Guze, October 3, 2019
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    China’s population woes

    Kevin Williamson of National Review Online explores a demographic challenge for China. China has a problem: not enough people. If you didn’t see that one coming, you haven’t been paying attention. More precisely, China’s problem is its shrinking work force. According to Beijing’s official numbers, China’s work force…
    Mitch Kokai, September 26, 2019
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    Martin Center column focuses on college in South Korea

    Preston Cooper writes for the Martin Center about disturbing data linked to higher education in an Asian nation. More advanced societies tend to have more educated citizens, which is one reason why politicians of all stripes call for sending more students to college. One country has taken that impulse…
    Mitch Kokai, September 25, 2019
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    Democratic tax would hurt retirement accounts

    Charles Fain Lehman of the Washington Free Beacon reports on the potential impact of a new tax supported by multiple Democratic presidential candidates. A financial transaction tax, though popular with 2020 Democrats, would raise little revenue and substantially shrink the U.S. economy, a recently released report concludes. A…
    Mitch Kokai, September 25, 2019
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    30 years of spending

    The General Assembly has provided real spending discipline since 2011, in marked contrast to the previous two decades. In the graphs below, we look first at the General Fund, then at total spending, then at the General Fund’s share of total spending. Within each set, we look first at inflation-adjust…
    Joseph Coletti, September 23, 2019