Capitalism

  • Post

    Look no further than film incentives, solar subsidies, and the recent vote on craft freedom

    From Ludwig von Mises’ Human Action, 1949, pp. 865-866. (To understand this passage in terms of the Orwellian language that dominates modern politics in North Carolina and elsewhere substitute the word stakeholders for Mises’ use of the phrase “pressure groups.”) The public looks askance upon the lobbyists and blames…
    Roy Cordato, May 19, 2017
  • Post

    Trade policy should be about consumers

    This is an open letter from my friend Professor Don Boudreaux at George Mason University to Congressman Sherrod Brown of Ohio, published at Professor Boudreaux’s popular Cafe’ Hayek blog (Emphasis is mine). It makes a very important and usually missed point about trade and trade policy. “Mr.
    Roy Cordato, May 18, 2017
  • Post

    Norman B. Ture’–A true understanding of supply side economics

    As the late Dr. Norman Ture’, one of the founding fathers of modern supply side economics explains, what most people, even many economists, don’t understand is that supply side economics is a methodological approach to answering certain kinds of questions in economics. These are primarily questions related to the…
    Roy Cordato, May 16, 2017
  • Post

    Russ Roberts’ wonderful loaf

    Russ Roberts offers an excellent antidote for those who believe that government ensures we get what we need in our lives. [W]ho makes sure there’s so much bread? You want rye, she wants ciabatta, or make it sourdough instead A baguette or a croissant,…
    Mitch Kokai, May 8, 2017
  • Post

    A defense of carried interest

    Financial analyst and certified public accountant Daniel Mazzola explains for Barron’s readers why carried interest doesn’t deserve its bad rap. Let’s look at the topic from the point of view of two small-town, small-business ventures. First, Jake owns a newsstand. His is a thriving business, and…
    Mitch Kokai, May 8, 2017
  • Post

    An argument against deglobalization

    Joseph Quinlan explains in a Barron’s column why it would be a bad idea for the U.S. government to reject globalization. Globalization—the unfettered cross-border flows of goods, services, people, and data—does not rule the world anymore. It may not even survive threats posed by a world…
    Mitch Kokai, April 17, 2017
  • Post

    United and the public’s distrust of capitalism

    Kevin Williamson of National Review Online offers an interesting take on the current controversy surrounding United Airlines. Capitalism is unpopular for four reasons: banks, health-insurance companies, cable providers, and airlines. These all have something in common. Airlines are in the wringer this week, with United shaming…
    Mitch Kokai, April 13, 2017
  • Post

    Putting Putin in perspective

    Christopher Caldwell explains in the latest issue of Hillsdale College’s Imprimis why Russians support strongman Vladimir Putin more than they support democratic capitalism. Russia retains elements of a kleptocracy based on oligarchic control of natural resources. But we must remember that Putin inherited that…
    Mitch Kokai, March 24, 2017