Nancy Pelosi with mask at lectern
Image from C-SPAN.org

Pelosi’s Days Numbered as U.S. House Speaker?

Miranda Devine argues at FoxNews.com that Nancy Pelosi could be on her way out as speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Nancy Pelosi used to point her angry finger at Donald Trump, but she leaves him in the dust when it comes to busting norms, dividing Congress and causing mayhem. If anyone is to blame for the hyper-partisanship in Washington these days, it’s the spiteful House speaker.

She behaves more like a Mafia don waging a gang war than a dignified, fair and honest presiding officer, which is what the speaker’s role requires.

Pelosi abuses her power in ways that once were unthinkable. Her speakership has been the antithesis of Lincoln’s entreaty to “the better angels of our nature.” Everyone in Congress — and, by extension, the nation — has been sullied by the spite and vitriol she has injected into the political sphere. There is no grace or Christian charity, just the barren wasteland of the zero-sum game, power for power’s sake.

It’s made all the worse by her increasingly frantic claims to be a “devout Catholic.”

The fact that all this venom is packaged in the shape of a small, elderly, expensively shod woman has bestowed upon her an element of deference her actions do not deserve. But last week there were a couple of signs that she’s finally worn out her welcome.

One was her game-playing over the Jan. 6 select committee, when she arbitrarily rejected two Republicans — Jim Jordan of Ohio and Jim Banks of Indiana — from an already stacked panel. …

… Pelosi is scared of Jordan and Banks, even though she has the majority. That’s the real reason. She is afraid they will bring to the committee, on behalf of the American people it is supposed to represent, the very reasonable question about her own culpability in the events of Jan. 6. Most obviously, what was her reason for leaving the Capitol Police outnumbered and unprotected?

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...