Kamala Harris and Joe Biden
Screen shot from JoeBiden.com

Best-case scenario for Trump fans in the years ahead

Eddie Scarry of the Washington Examiner offers Trump supporters suggestions for how to approach the next four years.

Joe Biden is now the president, and there’s nothing Republicans can do to change it. Now that that’s out of the way, let’s imagine what the next four years will be like in a best (realistic) case scenario for a person who wished the 2020 election had worked out differently.

Biden has done a lot of virtue-signaling in his career, and he surely will do a lot more during his presidency. He must. That’s almost all his party cares about anymore. Their top three priorities from greatest to least are virtue-signaling through weird symbols and gestures, then controlling the everyday lives of middle-class taxpayers, then earning the approval of foreigners.

But the good thing about virtue-signaling is that the negative consequences are fairly minimal. Appointing a transgender woman as the assistant secretary of Health and Human Services, one who has proven to be, at best, a mediocre public administrator, wasn’t an existential crisis for the nation. It made transgender people happy, and even though Democrats pretend they know how to “follow the science” (despite transgender people getting sick like every other person), it makes little difference otherwise.

So, Biden will do more of that, but hopefully, with his eye on reelection in 2024, he will refuse to act on the Left’s little fantasies of free health insurance for illegal immigrants, universal income for the lazy, and open borders for the world’s destitute. Enough of the country, still (thankfully), doesn’t want those things. Ideally, when his circus-show Cabinet tries pursuing these things, he’ll say no. …

… An end needs to come to the GOP’s self-flogging. Trump is out of office, and moving on isn’t difficult. He showed them how to energize millions of voters, old and new, and showed that the news media doesn’t have to set the terms of debate.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...