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Gingrich counters predictions of Republican civil war

Former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich writes at FoxNews.com that the Republican Party is not as likely to fracture as its opponents hope.

Various left-wing writers (some of them nominally Republican) have been salivating over the prospects of a GOP civil war. Nothing would make them happier than to see Republicans tearing each other apart in a fight over President Trump and the future of the GOP.

However, this will not happen.

It is a sign of how self-delusional the anti-Trump forces are that they could look at the House of Representatives vote on impeaching President Trump (for the second time) and convince themselves this is the harbinger of a Republican civil war.

The House voted 232-197 Wednesday to impeach the president. Every Democrat voted for impeachment, but only 10 Republicans did. The remaining 197 Republicans voted against the impeachment effort launched by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.

Only in the delusional world of the left could a vote in which 197 people were on one side and only 10 people were on the other side be described as the beginning of a civil war.

In fact, an accurate headline on the vote would read: “Overwhelming House Republican vote against impeachment with tiny faction in favor.” Yet the left is seeking to fan the embers of a GOP civil war into a flame.

The gap between Washington’s left-wing delusional view of the world and reality was further emphasized in John McLaughlin’s poll of voters in 17 swing states.

McLaughlin discovered that in these battleground states 80% of the Trump voters and 76% of all Republicans were less likely to vote for a member of Congress who voted to impeach President Trump.

The rejection of the Pelosi vendetta against President Trump extended beyond the GOP in this battleground survey. This second impeachment was seen as a waste of time by 60% of all voters. In fact, 65% of all voters thought the Democrats were “making this worse and keeping the country divided.”

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...