Joe Biden sits in plane sit while vice president
Screen shot from Biden for President campaign ad

Biden’s low profile could extend into his presidency

James Antle of the Washington Examiner explains why some Democrats are pushing for the president-elect to maintain a low profile.

President-elect Joe Biden is set to move into the White House in January, but the basement could come with him.

Republicans are already pillorying Biden for keeping a relatively low profile, but Democrats think that could be exactly what the voters want after four years of the ubiquitous President Trump.

A hairline fracture in Biden’s right foot sustained while playing with his dog is the latest thing that could sideline the 78-year-old incoming president, who was mocked by opponents for frequently calling early ends to his day and keeping a light public schedule for most of the presidential campaign.

“I don’t think it is a positive first step for this new administration, but it could be a very apt metaphor for the new president,” said Republican strategist John Feehery. “He is starting off as a lame duck, both figuratively and literally.”

Democrats are quick to point out that the jibes about Biden’s basement encampment did little to derail his candidacy, despite GOP predictions that Trump’s busy rally schedule would carry the day. Biden’s approach differed from Trump’s aggressive style and, to some, better reflected the realities of the pandemic, which has forced millions to embrace social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19. And 51.1% of the electorate responded favorably to the quieter candidate, though Trump has yet to concede and is still contesting the results in multiple states.

“Most Americans were tired of Donald Trump getting in their faces every day. Joe Biden, a direct descendant of the ‘No Drama Obama’ administration, understood that Americans needed a mental vacation from Trump’s daily trials and tribulations and ran a low-profile campaign,” said Democratic strategist Brad Bannon. “Biden believes that less is more when it comes to presidential visibility and power.”

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...