Voteers in election line

An election of constitutional norms versus changing rules

Victor Davis Hanson of National Review Online explores one important aspect of the choice in this year’s presidential race.

An inert Biden is playing the role of good ol’ Joe from Scranton, while his supporters hope not to change not only the presidency but also the very rules of how America has been governed for decades and even centuries.

Not long ago, the Left favored the Electoral College. California, New York, and Illinois automatically gave Democrats more than 100 Electoral College votes.

The Left bragged that their “Blue Wall” lock on solidly Democratic, union-heavy Midwestern states had ensured Barack Obama two presidential terms — and in 2016 would guarantee Hillary Clinton the presidency as well.

But in 2016, the Blue wall crumbled — perhaps permanently.

Now, furious progressives plan to end the constitutionally mandated Electoral College by hook or crook. They feel that it no longer serves their election purposes.

Ditto the traditional structure of the Supreme Court. …

… If elected president, Joe Biden would likely “pack” the Supreme Court with additional slots. That enlargement would ensure new activist left-wing justices.

In other words, the 151-year tradition of a Supreme Court with nine justices would end.

The Left also wants to pack the Senate — and change the rules. Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., would become new states. Their admission would end the tradition of 50-state America and would likely mean another four Democratic senators.

A Biden presidency and Democratic-controlled Senate would also quickly kill off what is left of the filibuster. Democrats wish to ensure that any surviving Republican minority could not impede progressive agendas in the same manner that the Democratic minority has stopped Republican legislation in recent years.

In sum, the 2020 election is not just about Joe Biden. …

… It is really a choice between changing rules when they are deemed inconvenient and respecting constitutional norms and long-held traditions that have served America well for many years.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...