Broken glass in door with knob
Image by Paul Barlow from Pixabay

Tallying the costs of nationwide protests

Alex Nester reports for the Washington Free Beacon on costs associated with recent nationwide protests.

What mainstream media outlets have dubbed as “mostly peaceful protests” caused up to $2 billion in property damage in the first two weeks of protests alone, Axios reported Wednesday.

The report found that the damage caused by demonstrations from May 28 to June 8 cost insurance agencies anywhere from $1 to $2 billion—more than any other event of civil unrest in United States history. The total cost of damage throughout the summer “far outstrip[s]” the millions in damages caused by the Los Angeles riots in 1992.

Loretta Worters, a spokeswoman for the Insurance Information Institute, told Axios that part of the reason the costs are so high is that the demonstrations following the death of George Floyd were not concentrated in one city.

“It’s not just happening in one city or state—it’s all over the country,” Worters said. “And this is still happening, so the losses could be significantly more.”

Many mainstream media outlets have dubbed the demonstrations as “mostly peaceful.” Just last month, CNN ran the chyron, “Fiery, But Mostly Peaceful Protests,” while a correspondent reported in front of a burning building in Kenosha, Wis.

Anti-police protests began in May following Floyd’s death. They have continued daily in some cities throughout the summer and often devolve into riots at night, which have caused major damage to government buildings, stores, and neighborhoods in cities like Portland, Seattle, and Chicago.

The John Locke Foundation’s Amy O. Cooke, “The Right AOC,” has focused attention on the protests as part of her video series: “The Right AOC on Point.” On June 11, Amy asked who’s leading Raleigh’s anti-police activity.

The following week, “The Right AOC on Point” explained how protesters’ actions threatened free speech.

One week later, Amy highlighted protesters’ ignorance of American history.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

Reader Comments