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Trump and the Hispanic vote

Rich Lowry of National Review Online argues that President Trump is winning over Hispanic voters.

Florida senator Rick Scott has an advanced degree in winning Hispanic voters as a Republican.

It has buoyed him in all his races, most recently his victory in his 2018 Senate race after serving two terms as governor, so he seems a logical person to ask about President Donald Trump’s eye-popping improvement among Hispanics in Florida.

A Marist/NBC poll last week had Trump narrowly ahead of Biden among Hispanics in Florida, and the president is leading handily among Cuban Americans.

Scott’s bottom line: “What I did, as governor, is I showed up, and Trump’s doing the same thing.”

By showing up, Scott means relentless community outreach and connecting on issues important to Hispanic voters.

On jobs, for instance, he says, “What I did is I went and announced jobs in all types of businesses, but a lot of the Hispanic businesses, I highlighted them. I created these awards, and I gave the Governor’s Business Ambassador Award to businesses that had added jobs.”

He identified himself with the deep-felt anti-Communism of exile communities. “I did a lot of rallies against Maduro, a lot of events against the Castro regime, and people care,” Scott says. “They walked away from socialism. They’ve had to leave from countries that became socialist.” …

… Trump isn’t Florida’s governor, so he obviously isn’t going to hold anything like the number of events that Scott did, but the president and Vice President Pence have been in South Florida constantly, often at anti-Maduro events. …

… The Trump team considers the Democrats culturally tone-deaf, whether it’s the attempted boycott of Goya, a staple of Cuban-American households; the push to use the ridiculous term “Latinx”; or the emphasis on the word “progressive,” which echoes the self-description of Latin America’s Communist regimes.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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