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Trump again names potential U.S. Supreme Court nominees

As he did during his first White House run in 2016, President Trump has released a public list of potential U.S. Supreme Court nominees. Multiple Supreme Court appointments are possible in the next presidential term.

Kevin Daley of the Washington Free Beacon reviews Trump’s list.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced 20 additions to his list of prospective Supreme Court nominees, including Republican senators Ted Cruz (Texas), Tom Cotton (Ark.), and Josh Hawley (Mo.) as well as 8 Trump appointees on the federals appeals courts.

A source familiar with the process told the Washington Free Beacon that the list was curated primarily by White House staff with regular and extensive input from outside advisers. The source added that the list is meant to highlight that the conservative legal establishment has a diverse and well-credentialed bench of candidates.

Wednesday’s announcement, made with an eye toward the November election, is meant to galvanize conservatives after halting progress in the promised revolution of jurisprudence Trump hawked in 2016. While legal conservatives have notched landmark victories on school choice, religious symbolism in public life, and the First Amendment, they have been attended by recent setbacks on LGBT rights and abortion. Joe Biden has yet to issue his own list though he has promised to name a black woman to the Supreme Court, greatly narrowing the universe of possibilities.

Biden has thus far resisted calls to identify specific judges he would consider for the High Court. Trump said Wednesday that Biden must release a list, but speculated that he wouldn’t because it would hurt his electability.

“Joe Biden has refused to release his list, perhaps because he knows the names are so extremely far left that they could never withstand public scrutiny or receive acceptance,” Trump said. “He must release a list of justices for people to properly make a decision as to how they will vote.”

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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