Louis DeJoy
Screen shot from C-SPAN.org

Correcting post office conspiracy myths

Eddie Scarry of the Washington Examiner highlights Postmaster General Louis DeJoy’s testimony to Congress late last week.

Congressional Republicans can always be counted on to screw something up — they’re easily intimidated by what the national media will say about them — but credit to the GOP-led Senate Homeland Security Committee for finally bringing in Postmaster General Louis DeJoy to suck the air out of the Democrats’ hysterical obsession with the United States Postal Service.

DeJoy has become a Scooby-Doo villain in the minds of Democrats who insist he’s doing President Trump’s bidding to (wait for it) slow down the mail!

To the Mystery Machine!

Except there is no mask to pull off. Republicans called DeJoy forward because he’s not doing anything interesting, let alone nefarious. He’s nothing that would be even kind of fun to hear about.

No, like everything else with the Postal Service, the changes he’s making (or at least trying to make) are absolutely sexless. DeJoy is coping with long-existing problems with the service, such as outdated systems, obsolete equipment, and, most pressing, a bleeding budget. …

… Democrats casually tell people who lose their jobs in coal mining and manufacturing to “learn to code” and “locate your nearest job retraining facility.” But they pretend that not a single change can be made to an agency that has failed in every way to keep up with technological changes.

DeJoy did say that he had removed scores of unneeded sorting machines due to a significant drop in letter mail over the years and that there has been a slowdown in recent weeks for delivering packages. …

Democrats tried to find a reason to get angry, but DeJoy said it plainly that the Postal Service is perfectly suited to deliver mail-in votes on time, though he encouraged everyone to send theirs in sooner rather than later.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...