Andrew Cuomo

Chicken-wing controversy highlights concerns about ‘experts’

Katie Pavlich shares at Townhall.com her concerns about COVID-19 pronouncements from politicians posing as experts.

Americans put their livelihoods, including generations of family-owned businesses, at risk for permanent closure. They were told their sacrifices would help save the lives of millions. They took on the patriotic duty to comply with government suggestions they were told would produce positive results.

But now, politicians making things up as they go after sending people to their deaths along the way are making a mockery of those who have already done their part.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, who ordered thousands of seniors infected with Wuhan coronavirus back into nursing homes — resulting in the deaths of thousands — has moved to regulating what does and does not count as a “substantive food.” In California, the same rules apply.

“To be a bar, you had to have food available — soups, sandwiches, etc. More than just hors d’ oeuvres, chicken wings. You had to have some substantive food — the lowest level of substantive food were sandwiches,” Cuomo said this week during a taxpayer-funded press conference.

Arbitrary. Capricious. Enraging. How does this stop the spread of Wuhan coronavirus? It doesn’t.

Why is Cuomo talking about chicken wings at all? Because he’s allowing bars to serve alcohol to seated patrons, as long as they order food. He’s moved the goalposts from food to “meal” after some New York City bars offered things like “Cuomo Chips” for $1. He deserves the mocking. This isn’t about bars, alcohol, or food. It’s about people’s lives. People are struggling to survive as the government continues to bear down on them without data or explanation about why their efforts this time will pay off. Studies now show lockdowns did little to slow the spread. In fact, keeping mass amounts of people indoors may have made things worse.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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