Joe Biden as vice president
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Democratic elites might not like what they get

Steve McCann describes in an American Thinker column what he calls a “fatal flaw” in Democratic elites’ electoral plan.

Today, the two dominant factions within the party are the ultra-wealthy beneficiaries of capitalism plus college educated sanctimonious elites (collectively the vast bulk of the ruling class) on the one hand, and Marxist indoctrinated self-described democratic socialists on the other.

The elites, in the personage of Barack Obama, chose to enter into this marriage of convenience with the socialists in 2008 in order to have another, albeit at the time numerically small, ally in their unrequited need to retain power. However, the primary targets of the now-dominant radical left has always been their fellow bedmates, the Democrat establishment and the ruling class. This marriage is about to end, not in an amicable divorce, but a palace revolution which could ultimately and deleteriously impact the future of the nation if Joe Biden wins in November.

History is replete with examples of the inevitable demise of alliances of convenience. Stories and fables throughout the ages chronicle the disaster that inevitably befalls those that ally themselves with avowed aggressors or natural predators, such as Aesop’s fable of the Scorpion and the Frog.

Yet, the establishment within the party and their financial and media benefactors believe they will be able to maintain control of the party by buying off their incongruent bedfellows with symbolism and minor compromises. Yet, these so-called best and brightest cannot help but be aware, as is much of the nation, that this active and dominant wing of the party are true-believers and, as the riots, violence and attempted destruction of the symbols of the nation’s heritage confirms, they are very impatient and determined to fundamentally transform America — regardless of who is president.

The party hierarchy may not openly admit it, but they do know who is their dominant ally, and what is their end game.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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