Tim Scott

Democrats diss black Republican senator

Katie Pavlich writes at TownHall.com about congressional Democrats’ shabby treatment of S.C. Sen. Tim Scott.

Over the past two weeks, Republican Senator Tim Scott, a black man from South Carolina, extended the olive branch of bipartisanship to Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on police reform.

On June 17, Scott introduced the JUSTICE Act as a way to tackle what he believes are needed reforms in cities across the country. He quickly gained 50 co-sponsors and opened the door to the “conversation” Democrats regularly claim America needs to have about race, communities and policing. But it turns out, the talking points about “having a conversation” weren’t stated in good faith. After Scott accepted 20 amendments on his legislation from Senate Democrats, they still voted it down, not even allowing debate on the bill.

But what’s even more egregious than playing politics with this issue is how Pelosi and Schumer framed their arguments without Scott in them.

During a speech on the floor after Democrats blocked the legislation, Schumer made the decision all about Mitch McConnell. After all, McConnell is a white man from Kentucky and easily fits into the Democrats’ false assertion that the Republican Party lacks diversity and is full of racists. …

… “The actual problem is not what is being offered; it is who is offering it. It took me a long time to figure the most obvious thing in the room. It’s not the ‘what.’ I’ve listened to the press conference, I’ve read the newspapers, I’m sure that anyone who is actually reporting on the bill has actually read the bill,” Scott said. “It’s the ‘who’ that’s offering this.” …

… Washington D.C.’s most partisan Democrats are attempting to write Senator Tim Scott out of the conversation. They’re doing it on purpose for political reasons and to continue their false narrative that Republicans are “racists.” It is despicable.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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