You can’t make it up: Warren wonders how Americans could vote for a liar

Tristan Justice writes for the Federalist about an interesting statement from a top-tier Democratic presidential candidate.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren struggled to understand Sunday how the American people could ever support a presidential candidate with a checkered history of telling the truth.

“How could the American people want someone who lies to them?” Warren passionately asked in response to a question on whether dishonesty was a disqualifying trait in a presidential candidate.

The question came during a gaggle with reporters during a campaign stop in Iowa.

Warren herself has a far from perfect history with honesty.

For decades, Warren lied about her ancestry and claimed to be Native American to gain professional and political leverage. Warren went as far as contributing recipes to an Indian cook book titled “Pow Wow Chow” and identified herself a Cherokee Indian under each. During her 2012 Senate campaign, she justified her claim to Native American heritage because her aunt often remarked that Warren had “high cheek bones like all of the Indians do.” …

… More recently, Warren has been caught lying about the reasons she left her first teaching job. On the campaign trial, Warren still complains that she was fired for being “visibly pregnant.” It’s a sympathetic story, to be sure, but a fake one at that. In October, the Washington Free Beacon uncovered documents from the local school district that Warren worked under showing that the school board unanimously offered a renewal on her teaching contract for a second year.

Yet Warren has continued to share her made-up story on the campaign trail despite the revelations from the Free Beacon. …

… Warren’s new call for honesty comes as the senator is under fire for allegedly making up a story that Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders told her in December 2018 that a woman could not capture the White House.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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