Impeachment and the 2020 election

Bill Livingstone muses at the American Thinker about Democrats’ impeachment strategy.

For Democrats, impeaching the president has never been the issue. The issue is the 2020 election.

Here’s the political map facing the Democrats. The economy is roaring, unemployment is at an all-time low for black Americans, Hispanic Americans, and women – key Democrat voting groups. Trump is hugely popular with his base, attracting enormous crowds at rallies. He’s moving his agenda forward, getting trade deals done, expanding the economy, building the wall, destroying terrorists. …

… So how do Democrats hope to win in November? By making Trump the issue. By demonizing the president to such an extent that voters will turn against him despite his successes.

The impeachment of President Trump is the key component of the Democrat game plan. It gives them a powerful talking point to feature in attack ads pillorying the president.

The strategy is already playing out in campaign ads. Democrats are wrapping themselves in the American flag, while thrashing the president for “putting politics ahead of our country.” They’re urging voters to “hold the president accountable for abusing his office and risking national security for his own gain.” In short, kick him out of office to safeguard the nation.

Trump’s campaign is on the defensive. Instead of attacking the Democrat’s agenda, he’s doling out millions on ads, arguing the impeachment “is a coup intended to take away the Power of the People.”

For Democrats, the impeachment process provides another important benefit. Message control. In PR parlance, you’re either creating dust, meaning you’re on the offensive, setting the news agenda, getting your narrative communicated, or you’re eating dust, on the defensive, responding to the other’s agenda.

Every day that impeachment leads the news cycle, Republicans eat dust.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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