Shocker! #MeToo movement makes male bosses afraid to meet with female employees

Emily Jashinsky writes for the Federalist about one negative consequence of the #MeToo movement.

In October, two years will have passed since Harvey Weinstein’s downfall broke the Me Too dam, inviting a surge of revelations about powerful men—some overdue, others undue—into the media spotlight. By the time one website’s brunch aficionados got around to Aziz Ansari in January 2018, the waters had already started to muddy, and public perception of the movement’s value started to shift. There was concern about the standards for purging accused men from public life, but also about Me Too’s effects on daily workplace dynamics. Eighteen months into the Me Too era, new evidence suggests those fears were warranted.

A recent poll commissioned by Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In organization found some men are increasingly struggling to interact with women in professional settings. …

… That Survey Monkey found a “32% jump” in male managers who were “uncomfortable participating in a common work activity with a woman” over one year is striking, especially since it came during a period in which the Me Too dust had started to settle. If accurate, the survey’s findings suggest women are already losing out on opportunities after Me Too, and in a wide variety of ways. …

… [L]eaders are experiencing discomfort and hesitation about interacting with their female colleagues. Nobody seems to know what the boundaries are or should be post-Me Too. It seems in practice they’ve already narrowed, but whether they’ve narrowed too far is another question. I certainly don’t have the answer.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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