The Left and factionalism

Jay Cost of National Review Online focuses his attention on the cultural Left.

By all accounts Joe Biden is getting set to run for president. His pitch will be as an experienced statesman and “happy warrior.” That was his modus operandi in government; recall in 2011, after the “grand bargain” on taxes and entitlements broke down between President Barack Obama and Speaker John Boehner, it was Biden who cut a deal with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell to raise the debt ceiling.

It’s a good pitch, and one that — Biden’s ideological judgments and policy preferences aside — could probably appeal to a wide swath of the country. To that end, Biden recently called Vice President Mike Pence “a good guy.” Hardly a controversial statement, and certainly in keeping with Biden’s style.

Yet it prompted outrage on the left from Cynthia Nixon — the actress from Sex and the City and unsuccessful challenger to Andrew Cuomo for the New York governorship last year. She blasted Biden for calling “America’s most anti-LGBT elected leader ‘a decent guy.’” “Please consider how this falls on the ears of our community,” she told Biden.

This is par for the course for the cultural Left. They are not interested in a truce on the difficult intersection of sexuality and faith, or really on any issue for that matter. “Live and let live” is out, as their ideological opponents must be made persona non grata in politics.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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