‘No fossil fuel money’ pledge an electoral loser in 2018

Michael Bastasch of the Daily Caller documents the political fortunes of 2018 election candidates who eschewed money related to fossil-fuel interests.

The vast majority of candidates for federal office in the 2018 election cycle who pledged not to take fossil fuel industry campaign donations were defeated, according to data shared with The Daily Caller News Foundation.

“The radical environmental agenda is a loser with the electorate,” Will Coggin, managing director of the Environmental Policy Alliance (EPA), told TheDCNF. (RELATED: Ocasio-Cortez’s Climate Alarm Isn’t Shocking. She’s Just Repeating Months Of Media Narrative)

Out of the more than 430 federal office-seekers who signed the “No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge,” only 28 won, according to research by EPA shared with TheDCNF. These figures don’t include candidates for state or local offices.

The “No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge” is a joint venture between 16 environmental groups, led by Oil Change U.S., that are part of the “keep it in the ground” movement to get rid of coal, gas and oil. …

… Environmentalists have increasingly agitated for Democrats to forgo taking fossil fuel industry money, and the Democratic National Committee initially endorsed such a ban in June 2018. However, the DNC walked back that prohibition in August 2018 by allowing candidates to accept donations from energy company employees.

Most “No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge” signatories were Democrats, though some Republicans and Libertarians also signed on. …

… Out of the 28 candidates who signed the anti-fossil fuel pledge, 13 were incumbents, according to EPA’s figures. In total, just 6 percent of pledge-signers seeking federal office won, opposed to 94 percent who lost.

“Affordable, domestically produced gas and other energy is part of a winning economy, and politicians stand in the way of American energy independence at their own peril,” Coggin said.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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