The perils of ‘policy paralysis’ for the GOP

Fred Bauer writes at National Review Online about the Republican Congress’ inability to compile a record of accomplishments.

One of the more unfortunate themes of the Trump era is that, even though Donald Trump seized the Republican nomination as a result of the deeper policy paralysis of the GOP, his rise has itself often become an excuse for even more paralysis. Important — but difficult — questions about how to govern in the 21st century have been endlessly deferred thanks to an endless obsession with the persona of the president. …

… The presence of a Republican — any Republican — in the White House made it very likely that Republicans would lose the House of Representatives in 2018; 1978 was the last time the incumbent party did not lose the House when it entered a midterm with unified control of the federal government. Nevertheless, the perpetual spectacle of White House Agonistes likely created additional headwinds for Republicans. The president’s feuds in and with the press seem to have turned off some swing voters.

But the unpopularity of the (thin) legislative record of the 115th Congress might also have cost Republicans votes. …

… Republicans might benefit from thinking about how they can pivot to confront the issues that concern many Americans, including members of their base and swing voters. This could be a way of making the party more inclusive and more effective.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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