The NYT’s top blunders

Jack Crowe of the Daily Caller compiles a cringe-worthy list of recent New York Times errors.

The New York Times published a report Monday which claimed they had “obtained” an unpublished government draft of a forthcoming climate assessment despite the fact that the draft has been publicly available online since January.

In light of this oversight, which TheNYT has since issued a correction on, here is a list of Times’ errors, inaccuracies, blunders, misrepresentations and general failures this year.

1) The New York Times Corrects Story Claiming 17 Intel Agencies ‘Agree’ On Russia

In a June report, The Times regurgitated the baseless claim that 17 U.S. intelligence agencies agreed Russia was responsible for meddling in the 2016 election. The report in question was published roughly one month after The Daily Caller News Foundation fact check team had thoroughly debunked the claim. …

… 2) The New York Times Mistook A Parody Twitter Account For The North Korean Regime

Times reporters incorrectly attributed a Tweet mocking American military efforts to the North Korean government when the Tweet was actually the product of an account dedicated to parodying North Korean news. The Times later issued a correction and admitted they fell for the parody. …

… 3) NYT Flubs Story On Food Stamps And Soda – Twice

The Times misreported data from a government study on what people buy on food stamps, then updated the story with an additional error without issuing a correction. The central claim of the story “In the Shopping Cart of a Food Stamp Household: Lots of Soda,” published in January, was that the Department of Agriculture has a report showing food stamps recipients spend nearly 10 cents of every dollar on soft drinks, but that number is almost double what the report actually said. …

… 4) NYT Reporter Who Called Sessions Corrupt Forced To Correct His Statement: Actually, He Meant Loretta Lynch

New York Times Washington Editor Jonathan Weisman was forced to retract a June tweet after he insinuated Attorney General Jeff Sessions was corrupt.

Weisman asserted that former FBI Director James Comey testified Sessions asked him directly to call the Russia probe “a matter.” In actuality, the director testified that former Attorney General Loretta Lynch approached him with that request over the investigation into Clinton’s use of a private server.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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