S.C. governor has big idea for big Obama jobs speech

If the president really wants to make some big news with next week’s jobs speech, he could take a suggestion from South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, as reported in Human Events:

At any rate, if Obama really wants to make a difference with this speech, he’ll follow Haley’s advice and announce, “I’m going to disband the National Labor Relations Board.”

It will admittedly take a little outside-the-box thinking for the President to see things Governor Haley’s way, but what’s the point of simply rehashing the same old tired, failed Big Government programs? Obama will own the headlines, for at least a day or two, if he announces the dissolution and restraint of “rogue agencies with a bully mentality,” as Haley described the NLRB. People will also be much more excited about future Obama speeches. Right now, they’re all blending together into Max Headroom stutters, with each endlessly repeated talking point costing billions of dollars.

Governor Haley, of course, has good reasons for her dim view of the NLRB. Their action against Boeing imperiled a thousand jobs in right-to-work South Carolina – which, as she points out, were not jobs being “stolen” from Washington State, where Boeing’s union workforce resides. She said she was so taken aback by the unprecedented NLRB action against Boeing that she thought it was some kind of joke.

Haley said the anti-business actions of the Obama Administration have made the President “the biggest recruiter for other countries,” as American businesses conclude it’s safer to move their operations overseas. She’s fed up with a chief executive who spends his days executing American jobs. “How can we in this country have faith in someone who protects unions and federal agencies?” she asked. “This president works for us. He owes us answers. He owes Boeing answers.”

She’s decidedly unimpressed with Obama’s protestations that the NLRB is an “independent agency” he has little control over. It’s funny how all those huge federal agencies are suddenly “independent,” but nobody in the private sector is independent anymore.

George Leef will not be surprised to read about the NLRB‘s negative impact.

Mitch Kokai / Senior Political Analyst

Mitch Kokai is senior political analyst for the John Locke Foundation. He joined JLF in December 2005 as director of communications. That followed more than four years as chie...

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