SB3

  • Post

    Unsustainable energy, illustrated

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration offers another glimpse, if you’re paying attention, into just how government-driven North Carolina’s “powerhouse solar industry” actually is. Look at this graph, from the EIA’s “Today in Energy” post entitled “North Carolina has more PURPA-qualifying solar facilities than any other state“: EIA explains:…
    Jon Sanders, April 3, 2017
  • Post

    Carolina Journal exposes layer upon layer of solar cronyism

    I’ve long noticed two prongs of the solar lobby‘s message to legislators and the media — two messages that I think are completely at odds with one another: Solar is a powerhouse industry in North Carolina. Second in the nation in solar! Solar cannot make it as…
    Jon Sanders, March 21, 2017
  • Post

    If you can’t win customers and investors, win politicians

    …it’s well known that the renewable energy industry’s business model is entirely based on and utterly dependent on capturing public subsidies. It’s all about winning government goodies.—Yours truly, 8/28/15 Since the renewable energy industry cannot build itself by winning customers and investors on the strength of its own merits, they have to win politicians…
    Jon Sanders, March 16, 2017
  • Post

    Cute. But sorry, renewables, the “Gig” is up…

    A light-hearted tweet from Clean Energy NC on twitter hearkens back to Back to the Future (the scene, for those of you woefully in the dark about it): NC Solar Power Could Send Doc Back to the Future https://t.co/kGqzr2s19y #CleanEnergy #NCGA pic.twitter.com/Bl1eI2ObvR — Clean Energy in NC (@cleanenergync) June 30, 2016 Thing is, the time machine car was originally powered with a teensy pellet of plutonium. To generate an equivalent burst of energy naturally, compactly, they needed a bolt of lightning. Renewable energy!? Hello? Hello? Anybody home? Huh? Think, McFly!
    Jon Sanders, June 30, 2016
  • Post

    A low-cost energy source that lowers rates and CO2 emissions, to boot

    That would be natural gas. Because of technological change in natural gas exploration, our rates are falling, on net (offsetting increases owing to the REPS law): Also falling: carbon dioxide emissions, as the federal Energy Information Administration has shown is mostly because of change to natural…
    Jon Sanders, May 26, 2016
  • Post

    ‘Renewables are incapable of replacing hydrocarbons at scale’

    This isn’t news to Locker Room readers (some recent examples), but I’m glad to read this in The Hill this week from Kathleen Hartnett White. Here’s a brief snippet, with the understanding that there is plenty more where this comes from: Policymakers intent on imposing a…
    Jon Sanders, March 31, 2016
  • Post

    How utterly, utterly impossible is battery storage for renewable electricity

    Here is a line from this past Sunday’s issue of Fayetteville Observer, where real-world, adult concerns about the marked inefficiency of nondispatchable energy sources, the subsidies they receive, the costs imposed on poor ratepayers by playing crony games with a state monopoly over an indispensable household necessity, the practicalities of battery…
    Jon Sanders, January 11, 2016
  • Post

    Three enemies of wind and solar: nature, economics, and simple math

    My newsletter today explains. Following are just the top four bullet points: The renewable energy sources (wind and solar) aren’t a one-for-one tradeoff for traditional resources (coal, gas, nuclear). Wind and solar are far less efficient than traditional resources. It’s more of a one-third to one-fourth for one tradeoff. Furthermore, wind…
    Jon Sanders, August 17, 2015