Category Archives: Local government

New Carolina Journal Online features

Barry Smith reports for Carolina Journal Online on a state audit showing that Tarboro’s former city manager made $366,000 in excessive purchases. Roy Cordato’s Daily Journal explains how the Hobby Lobby case exposes a clash between positive and negative rights.

New Carolina Journal Online features

Carolina Journal Online reports on a John Locke Foundation report that urges N.C. lawmakers to repeal their new tax on electronic cigarettes. Richard Dietz’s Daily Journal focuses on a Winston-Salem ordinance that exempts newspaper vendors from new restrictions on door-to-door sales.

New Carolina Journal Online features

Dan Way reports for Carolina Journal Online about critics’ concerns over a proposal to tax plastic bags in Raleigh. John Hood’s Daily Journal offers a conservative proposal to resolve state budget differences.

A plight for cutting government spending on the arts, from a classical music junkie

I wish I knew the full answer to why so many within the music world are predominantly left-wing; Thomas Jefferson was a fine violinist, if nothing else. But I believe that one likely culprit is the government – in particular, Mecklenburg County. Through a sort of superficial allegiance to the nourishment of the arts, theyContinue Reading

Raleigh marathon gets IMPLAN-inflated

Read about it in my newsletter today. A snippet: The paper reported that the Carolina Hurricanes had an estimated economic impact per game of about $1 million. The average home game attendance was just shy of 18,000 fans (17,971). Bear those figures in mind when reading about an economic impact study of Raleigh’s Rock’n’Roll Marathon.Continue Reading

New Carolina Journal Online features

Harry Painter reports for Carolina Journal Online about a challenge to race-based preferences at UNC-Chapel Hill. Michael Lowrey’s Daily Journal questions two large N.C. counties’ arguments for raising the local sales tax.

Salisbury should’ve listened to Sanera

From Carolina Journal today: One North Carolina city borrowed millions from its water and sewer fund to support its municipal broadband service and paid the price with a downgraded bond rating. This spring, Moody’s downgraded Salisbury’s bond rating, citing debts by its Fibrant broadband service. Moody’s notes that Salisbury borrowed $7.6 million from its waterContinue Reading

New Carolina Journal Online features

Barry Smith reports for Carolina Journal Online on Salisbury’s use of sewer fees to prop up its money-losing municipal broadband system. John Hood’s Daily Journal explains that North Carolina’s recent drop in unemployment is due “largely” to people getting jobs.